Our Programs

Kids Play provides year round sport for development programs that promote gender equity.  Through sports-based activities, we bring boys and girls together in a safe environment and teaches Olympic values of Excellence, Friendship and Fair Play.

Let’s Play Fair - Using sport to shift attitudes, behaviors and social norms about gender equity.  

Girls Dream Big - Helping girls attend and stay in school while also providing tools to empower them to be Champions in Life.

One of the founding principles of the Olympic movement is non-discrimination; everyone should have an equal opportunity to achieve his or her full potential.  This is not the case in many countries, where girls are significantly under-represented in schools, negatively impacting their future economic and employment opportunities.

KPI believes that sport can be a powerful catalyst for social change and is dedicated to rebuilding community, breaking down walls of segregation and developing relationships between boys and girls, men and women based on trust and mutual respect.

Our long-term objectives include:

  • Participants are actively connected to KPI into adulthood
  • Increased employment for women in the community
  • Women in the community have higher levels of education
  • Women hold more leadership roles in the community
  • Gender roles within the home shift toward being more equitable
  • Decreased gender-based violence
  • Increased value of sport for the community

We recognize that these are long-term aspirations and that to get there we need to target a set of preconditions and shorter-term outcomes.

Our immediate objectives include:

  • The promotion of teamwork and relationships between boys and girls and an increased understanding of each other’s contributions in the program, family, community and society
  • Increased understanding of gender and gender issues
  • Increased self-confidence and a positive identity
  • Facilitating the positive influence of role models (coaches) on participants in the program
  • Increased sport participation and general physical activity
  • Activation and participation of family members and other people in the community in program activities
  • Establish strong partnerships with administration at schools surrounding program site

PROGRAM SITE

Kids Play Int’l is the only sport for development program working in beautiful Gatagara, Rwandaa rural area about 90 minutes from the capital city of Kigali.

FAIR PLAY & GENDER EQUITY

Genocide adds another layers, making gender equity more challenging, as the trauma of conflict where women were the victims of torture, rape, and other acts of gender based violence still lingers. We believe that sport can serve as a powerful medium for shifting attitudes, behaviors and even social norms about gender equity.

In the sport context, we can challenge assumptions and stereotypes, create unique opportunities for dialogue about girls, boys, men, women and gender equity, and create an experience that helps boys and girls actually practice playing together in new ways.

Our entire program culture and experience is built around instilling in each and every player, coach and community member who participates with us, the fundamental idea that the way we can and should treat each other in the spirit of Fair Play and if there are barriers to treating each other this way, we must take action to break down these barriers.

USING SPORT TO PROMOTE GENDER EQUITY

The United Nations has recognized that sport is “a viable and practical tool” to assist in the achievement of The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), and in 2003, adopted a resolution on the role of sport as a means to promote health, education, development and peace.  In its 2004 Sport Recreation and Play report, the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) concluded that:

“Sport, recreation, and play improve the quality of education by developing the whole child, not just their intellectual capacities.  Community recreation programmes in and around schools are excellent ways to create safe spaces for children and adolescents, as well as to continue learning beyond the classroom.”